"Reel Reviews: ‘Spider-man: Far From Home’ features cobbled together, weak plot" by: Jessica Shepard

   Spider-Man: Far From Home is the sequel to Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017) and the 23rd film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU). 
   The film is directed by Jon Watts, written by Chris McKenna and Erik Sommers, and stars Tom Holland as Peter Parker/Spider-Man, alongside Samuel L. Jackson, Zendaya, Cobie Smulders, Jon Favreau, J.B. Smoove, Jacob Batalon, Martin Starr, Marisa Tomei, and Jake Gyllenhaal.
   In Ixtenco, Nick Fury (Jackson) and Maria Hill (Smulders) investigate an unnatural storm and later encounter the Earth Elemental. 
   A super-powered man, Quentin Beck (Gyllenhaal), arrives to fight the creature. 
   In New York City, the Midtown School of Science and Technology restarts its academic year to accommodate the students who were among those resurrected in “the Blip” eight months prior. 
   The Blip is what everyone calls the sudden five-year disappearance then reappearance of half of the Earth’s people that happened during “Avengers: Endgame” when Thanos used the Infinity Stones.
   The school organizes a two-week summer field trip to Europe, where Peter Parker (Holland), still distraught over Stark’s death, plans to confess his growing feelings for classmate MJ (Zendaya) and avoid heroics. 
   At a fundraiser for the homeless coordinated by his Aunt May (Tomei), Parker is forewarned by Happy Hogan (Favreau) that he will be contacted by Nick Fury, but Parker chooses to ignore the call. 
   Parker leaves after being overwhelmed by questions about the late Tony Stark and fate of the Avengers.
   Parker and his friends travel to Venice and are among those attacked by the Water Elemental, which proceeds to wreak havoc on the city. 
   Beck arrives and destroys the creature, while Parker attempts to help but only barely.
   Italian press report that Beck is a man of mystery and he takes his superhero name from that, dubbing himself “Mysterio.”
   Fury meets with Parker and gives him Stark’s glasses, which were meant for his successor. 
   The glasses are equipped with the artificial intelligence E.D.I.T.H., which has access to all databases of Stark Industries and commands a large orbital weapons supply. 
   Beck claims the Elementals killed his family and that he hails from a different reality, one among many in the Multiverse. 
   Parker rejects Fury’s call to arms, opting to rejoin his class, but Fury covertly redirects the school trip’s itinerary to Prague, where the Fire Elemental is projected to strike. 
   It appears at a carnival, but Beck, with Parker’s help, destroys it. 
   Fury and Hill invite Parker and Beck to Berlin to discuss the formation of a new superhero team. 
   True to that angsty teenage form, Parker backs out citing his desire to stay with his friends and participate in their field trip with the girl he really likes.
   At that midpoint, we’re given another view of Beck and how he really is the villain in all of this.
   But, I’m not going to give you any spoilers – you’ll have to check it out for yourself.
   Overall, I found the film funnier than I expected and the plot a little weak, though plausible in the MCU.
   It just got old towards the end.
   Still, it’s No. 1 at box offices worldwide, raking in over $185 million at a PG-13 rating for sci-fi action violence, some language, and brief suggestive comments.   Spider-Man: Far From Home is the sequel to Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017) and the 23rd film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU). 
   The film is directed by Jon Watts, written by Chris McKenna and Erik Sommers, and stars Tom Holland as Peter Parker/Spider-Man, alongside Samuel L. Jackson, Zendaya, Cobie Smulders, Jon Favreau, J.B. Smoove, Jacob Batalon, Martin Starr, Marisa Tomei, and Jake Gyllenhaal.
   In Ixtenco, Nick Fury (Jackson) and Maria Hill (Smulders) investigate an unnatural storm and later encounter the Earth Elemental. 
   A super-powered man, Quentin Beck (Gyllenhaal), arrives to fight the creature. 
   In New York City, the Midtown School of Science and Technology restarts its academic year to accommodate the students who were among those resurrected in “the Blip” eight months prior. 
   The Blip is what everyone calls the sudden five-year disappearance then reappearance of half of the Earth’s people that happened during “Avengers: Endgame” when Thanos used the Infinity Stones.
   The school organizes a two-week summer field trip to Europe, where Peter Parker (Holland), still distraught over Stark’s death, plans to confess his growing feelings for classmate MJ (Zendaya) and avoid heroics. 
   At a fundraiser for the homeless coordinated by his Aunt May (Tomei), Parker is forewarned by Happy Hogan (Favreau) that he will be contacted by Nick Fury, but Parker chooses to ignore the call. 
   Parker leaves after being overwhelmed by questions about the late Tony Stark and fate of the Avengers.
   Parker and his friends travel to Venice and are among those attacked by the Water Elemental, which proceeds to wreak havoc on the city. 
   Beck arrives and destroys the creature, while Parker attempts to help but only barely.
   Italian press report that Beck is a man of mystery and he takes his superhero name from that, dubbing himself “Mysterio.”
   Fury meets with Parker and gives him Stark’s glasses, which were meant for his successor. 
   The glasses are equipped with the artificial intelligence E.D.I.T.H., which has access to all databases of Stark Industries and commands a large orbital weapons supply. 
   Beck claims the Elementals killed his family and that he hails from a different reality, one among many in the Multiverse. 
   Parker rejects Fury’s call to arms, opting to rejoin his class, but Fury covertly redirects the school trip’s itinerary to Prague, where the Fire Elemental is projected to strike. 
   It appears at a carnival, but Beck, with Parker’s help, destroys it. 
   Fury and Hill invite Parker and Beck to Berlin to discuss the formation of a new superhero team. 
   True to that angsty teenage form, Parker backs out citing his desire to stay with his friends and participate in their field trip with the girl he really likes.
   At that midpoint, we’re given another view of Beck and how he really is the villain in all of this.
   But, I’m not going to give you any spoilers – you’ll have to check it out for yourself.
   Overall, I found the film funnier than I expected and the plot a little weak, though plausible in the MCU.
   It just got old towards the end.
   Still, it’s No. 1 at box offices worldwide, raking in over $185 million at a PG-13 rating for sci-fi action violence, some language, and brief suggestive comments.

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