History

Thu
16
Sep

Tidehaven was early port on Tres Palacios

   From Matagorda County genweb
www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~txmatago/

Thu
16
Sep

PAHA to present ‘Images of Valor’ exhibit of Latinos, Latinas in WWII

   PALACIOS – Beginning Sept. 28, Palacios Area Historical Association will present “Images of Valor: U.S. Latinos and Latinas in World War II,” an exhibition created by the School of Journalism and Center for Mexican American Studies at The University of Texas at Austin and produced by Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.
   Through images and stories, this 12-panel exhibition provides a historical overview of U.S. Latino participation in World War II. 
   In addition to photographs from the project’s archives, “Images of Valor” incorporates contemporary photographs of men and women of the WWII generation by photojournalist Valentino Mauricio. 
   The exhibition focuses on individual stories that reveal larger themes such as citizenship and civil rights and features excerpts from the more than 500 oral history interviews that were part of the project.

Thu
09
Sep

Remembering when weather affected all

From Matagorda County genweb
www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~txmatago/

Thu
09
Sep

Getting Matagorda County out of mud

Compiled By Marin Brown McAllister Junior Historian
1973-74 www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~txmatago/

Thu
02
Sep

"Van Vleck second oldest district in county" Researched and written by David Holubec

   Matagorda County was one of the original 23 counties created when the Constitution of the Republic of Texas was adopted March 17, 1836.
   Bailey Hardeman (1795-1836), signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence, migrated to Texas from Tennessee in 1835. 
   He settled on the banks of Caney Creek. Other Hardeman family members followed and a thriving community called Hardeman Post Office (1860-1901) was born.
   Education was a priority to the earliest residents of Matagorda County. School was held early in the settlement of most of the communities—usually under less than acceptable circumstances and with few materials.  
   During the 1800s, private schools were the primary avenues for educating Matagorda County students. Many plantation owners employed private tutors for their children.
   Prior to the Civil War, educating black students was against the law, but post-war, schools for black children formed in most communities.  

Thu
26
Aug

Austin on Tres Palacios Bay

   Though Moses Austin died before fulfilling his plans for a community called Austina on the mouth of the Colorado River, Austin was the name given as early as 1836 to a site just south of Oliver Point (formerly known as Point Plesant or Pleasant), four miles across Tres Palacios Bay from what is now Palacios, in southwestern Matagorda County. 
    The settlement, also known as Port Austin, was platted to be a town of at least 166 blocks, with blocks reserved for a college, a church, and public buildings, as well as an area labeled Hyde Park. 
   The development was a project of Capt. Thomas Bridges, a Massachusetts shipmaster who had run supplies from New Orleans through the Mexican blockade during the Texas Revolution. 
   He originally bought land near Oyster Lake but later moved the townsite north toward Oliver Point. 

Thu
26
Aug

Attwell early printer in county

   James Attwell (Atwell), printer, newspaper publisher, and editor, was born in New York and apparently moved to Texas soon after the Texas Revolution. 
   He was publisher and printer of the Matagorda Colorado Gazette and Advertiser, the first issue of which appeared on May 16, 1839, with W. Donaldson as editor.  
   By Dec. 25, 1839, Attwell had sold the paper to William Douglas Wallach, but he continued to work on the Gazette as a printer. Whenever Wallach was away, Attwell served as his “authorized Agent” and had “entire control” of the paper. 
   The Gazette apparently ceased publication in 1843. 
   Attwell later became editor and proprietor of the Matagorda Weekly Despatch (1843–46). 
   He was apparently assisted in the editorial work by Richard Drake Sebring, who died in August 1844.
   By 1850 Attwell had moved to Lavaca (now Port Lavaca). 

Thu
19
Aug

Matagorda Peninsula a big part of county’s early history

   Matagorda Peninsula is a narrow strip of land separating the Gulf of Mexico from East Matagorda and Matagorda bays.   
   It is located at 28°35’ north, 96° 01’ west.   
   The peninsula is 51 miles long and is crossed at midpoint by the Colorado River.   
   Brown Cedar Cut, at the northeast end of the peninsula, connects East Matagorda Bay with the Gulf.   
   Cavallo Pass, at its south end, provides access to Matagorda Bay.  
   Early reference is made to the peninsula as Isla de Culebra, or Snake Island.   
   Karankawa Indians probably inhabited the area in the summers and moved to the mainland for the winter.   
   With cessation of the Indian threat, the peninsula opened for settlement.   
   A small German colony of about twelve houses, midway between the Caney Creek connection and Decros Point, was destroyed in the storm of 1854, rebuilt, and destroyed again in 1875.  

Thu
12
Aug

"Cherry campus schools date to 1901" By Mary Belle Ingram

Contributed photo

From Matagorda County genweb
www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~txmatago/

 

Thu
12
Aug

"Original school site a strawberry field" By Mary Belle Ingram

From Matagorda County genweb
www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~txmatago/

 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - History