History

Thu
26
Nov

How Thanksgiving was celebrated in the county over the years

Collegeport
   Citrus Grove and Collegeport observed Thanksgiving with their annual Thanksgiving dinner at Citrus Grove. About 120 were present, including many of the original settlers and out of town guests. Many guests came back that night to attend the “forty-two” and old fashioned play party held there. This Thanksgiving dinner has been given annually ever since Citrus Grove was settled years ago, and serves as a reunion for many old friends.—Daily Tribune, Friday, December 5, 1941
   Midfields
   Mrs. Abbie Anderson and son spent the Thanksgiving holidays in Nada with her daughter, Mrs. Lester Bunge.
   Mr. and Mrs. Ludwin Keller and children spent the Thanksgiving holidays in the home of Mr. and Mrs. R.E. Coffin.
   Miss Gladys Trujcak was home for Thanksgiving holidays.—Daily Tribune, December 3, 1942
   Pledger

Thu
19
Nov

Matagorda doctor went on to become ‘father’ of UTMB

Thomas C. Thompson’s grave at Lakeview Cemetery in Galveston.
From: Find A Grave

   Thomas C. Thompson, physician and pharmacist, was born on September 28, 1839, in Matagorda County, Texas, the son of Johann and Ellen (Emily) Thompson. 
   He attended Baylor University at Independence and the University of North Carolina. 
   He received a medical degree from Jefferson Medical College (Philadelphia) in 1861 and served as a Confederate Army surgeon during the Civil War. 
   Afterwards, Thompson practiced medicine in Matagorda and Columbus for a few years before moving to Galveston. 
   In addition to medical practice, Thompson established a pharmaceutical business in Galveston and San Antonio.  
   He was appointed to the University of Texas Board of Regents in February 1887 and served on that board until his death.  

Thu
12
Nov

"Lumber company founders inspired by Alamo presence"

John Sutherland
Matagorda County TXGenWeb

   EDITOR’S NOTE: Since the Alamo Lumber Company is closing in Bay City, we’re presenting its history that was published in the Bay City Tribune in 1977 and is included in a book of local history.

Thu
05
Nov

Continued: Japanese preacher’s American journey began in Collegeport

   EDITOR’S NOTE: Paul Watanbe came to America in 1903, at the age of 16, from Japan and made his way to Collegeport in 1909, when he was part of the inaugural class at the Gulf Coast University of Industrial Arts at Collegeport.
   This was the start of a remarkable young man’s journey that would also include Bryan College, Baylor and Simmons College in Abilene.
      Next up was Yale.
   We’ll tell about Watanbe’s experience in the next several issues.

From last week
   Two Japanese-American sisters who attended Hardin-Simmons University during World War II have given $7,500 to the institution’s Loyalty Fund from “redress funds” that they received from the United States Government.
   The Loyalty Fund provides scholarship assistance for current and prospective students.

Thu
29
Oct

Continued: Japanese preacher’s American journey began in Collegeport

Courtesy of Wikipedia
Above, Jessie and Grace Watanbe graduated from Hardin-Simmons in 1946.

   EDITOR’S NOTE: Paul Watanbe came to America in 1903, at the age of 16, from Japan and made his way to Collegeport in 1909, when he was part of the inaugural class at the Gulf Coast University of Industrial Arts at Collegeport.
   This was the start of a remarkable young man’s journey that would also include Bryan College, Baylor and Simmons College in Abilene.
      Next up was Yale.
   We’ll tell about Watanbe’s experience in the next several issues.
From last week

      Watanabe Sisters Win High Honors
   Jessie Watanabe, 1946 graduate, was awarded the $25 cash prize during the commencement exercises for the best essay on the subject, “How Can I Improve Race Relations,” given by Elta Campbell Roberts in memory of her sis-
ter, Willie Beatrice Campbell, a graduate of 1913.

Thu
22
Oct

Continued: Japanese preacher’s American journey began in Collegeport

Courtesy of Wikipedi
Church service at Poston 1 Internment Camp.

   EDITOR’S NOTE: Paul Watanbe came to America in 1903, at the age of 16, from Japan and made his way to Collegeport in 1909, when he was part of the inaugural class at the Gulf Coast University of Industrial Arts at Collegeport.
   This was the start of a remarkable young man’s journey that would also include Bryan College, Baylor and Simmons College in Abilene.
      Next up was Yale.
   We’ll tell about Watanbe’s experience in the next several issues.
From last week

      News of evacuation
   When the family received the news of their evacuation, Paul was still at home, though very ill. He packed his library in crates and the Caucasian ministers stored them for him as well as some of the family possessions including Paul’s sermon notes. They sold their appliances and furniture and liquidated their household.

Thu
15
Oct

Continued: Japanese preacher’s American journey began in Collegeport

   EDITOR’S NOTE: Paul Watanbe came to America in 1903, at the age of 16, from Japan and made his way to Collegeport in 1909, when he was part of the inaugural class at the Gulf Coast University of Industrial Arts at Collegeport.
   This was the start of a remarkable young man’s journey that would also include Bryan College, Baylor and Simmons College in Abilene.
      Next up was Yale.
   We’ll tell about Watanbe’s experience in the next several issues.
From last week

      The (Simmons) Brand editor is disappointed that the students of Simmons College did not respond more freely to the proposition to send a cash contribution to Paul Watanabe, an alumnus of the college who is doing evangelistic work in his native country, Japan. 
   The fact that the collection was so small is probably due to the fact that only a small number of students now in school were here when Paul was a student in Simmons. 

Thu
08
Oct

Continued: Japanese preacher’s American journey began in Collegeport

Matagorda County TXGenWeb
This is one of four pictures that were Paul’s graduation pictures in the
1919 Simmons College Yearbook The Bronco.

   EDITOR’S NOTE: Paul Watanbe came to America in 1903, at the age of 16, from Japan and made his way to Collegeport in 1909, when he was part of the inaugural class at the Gulf Coast University of Industrial Arts at Collegeport.
   This was the start of a remarkable young man’s journey that would also include Bryan College, Baylor and Simmons College in Abilene. 
   Next up was Yale.
   We’ll tell about Watanbe’s experience in the next several issues.
From last week 
   The Woman’s Club of Collegeport was treated to a visit from Paul on January 1, 1917.
   Instead of the regular program, a talk on “Japanese Women” was given by Mr. Paul Watanabe, a Japanese. He closed with a Japanese song.— Woman’s Club minutes, Jan 25th 1917
   Paul was enrolled in Simmons College in Abilene, Texas by 1918.
   Paul Watanabe Speaks 
to Students In Chapel

Thu
01
Oct

A Japanese preacher’s early American journey began in Collegeport

Matagorda County TXGenWeb
Paul Yorishige Watanabe

   EDITOR’S NOTE: Paul Watanbe came to America in 1903, at the age of 16, from Japan and made his way to Collegeport in 1909, when he was part of the inaugural class at the Gulf Coast University of Industrial Arts.
   This was the start of a remarkable young man’s journey that would also include Bryan College, Baylor and Simmons College in Abilene. 
   Next up was Yale.
   We’ll tell about Watanbe’s experience in the next several issues.

   Family of Paul Yorishige Watanabe & Chie Watanabe Katsuno

Thu
24
Sep

Famed author, detective from Matagorda County

Matagorda County TXGenWeb
Charles Siringo with saddled horse in front of the Hotel Palacios in 1913.

   Charles Angelo Siringo, cowboy, author, and detective, was born on February 7, 1855, in Matagorda County, Texas. 
   His father, Italian immigrant Antonio Siringo, died a year later, leaving the boy’s Irish mother, Bridgit (White) Siringo, to care for him and his older sister. 
   After some schooling he made several trips on the Mississippi from New Orleans to St. Louis and back. 
   In 1870, Siringo was in Texas, where he secured work as a cowboy. 
   For six years he worked in the Texas coastal plain region for Joseph Yeamans, W.B. Grimes, and others. 
   For nearly two years in 1871–72 he was employed as a cowboy by Jonathan E. and Abel H. (Shanghai) Pierce on their Rancho Grande near present-day Blessing. 
   In 1876 Siringo became a trail driver and accompanied a herd of 2,500 longhorns over the Chisholm Trail from Austin to Kansas. 

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