History

Thu
11
Feb

Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church began same year as Markham

Matagorda County TXGenWeb
Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church first served blacks living in the ‘Red Town’ of Markham’s early ‘Tent City.’

Compiled by Thelma Smith
Matagorda County TXGenWeb

Thu
04
Feb

Enterprise Baptist founders recognized need for new beginning

Matagorda County TXGenWeb
Enterprise Baptist Church in Bay City was founded in 1909.

Matagorda County TXGenWeb

Thu
28
Jan

Early Sargent, when Caney ran wide, deep

Matagorda County TXGenWeb
Sargent had the distinction of having the last swing bridge on the Intercoastal Waterway.

By Billie Jean Sanford
   Sargent, situated on FM 457 three miles from the Gulf, takes its name from George Sargent, a farmer and rancher who decided that the tall, waving prairie grasses which grew so abundantly here would make good pasture for livestock.
   Early in 1834, Sargent and his family emigrated from Cornwall, England, to Texas. Settling first in the Refugio area, they later moved to Victoria where the marauding Indians forced them into another move. By now George Sargent had married and had a family, including an eight-year-old son, John Thomas. 
   George Sargent purchased some Caney bottomland in 1844 and built a ranch house three or four miles inland from the Gulf between Caney Creek and Cedar Lake.
   In those days Caney Creek was both wide and deep and emptied directly into the Gulf. During the war years, Sargent was able to ship his Texas beef and cotton along this water route without being detected, as there was no actual port.

Thu
21
Jan

LeTulle’s legacy long-remembered in Bay City

   Victor Lawrence LeTulle, Bay City businessman, farmer, rancher and philanthropist, was born in Columbus, Texas, on July 5, 1864. 
   His surname was derived from the family’s place of origin, Tulle, France.
   He was the son of Victor D. LeTulle (November 25, 1832 - November 5, 1914), who was born in Guyandotte, Cabell County, West Virginia, and was buried in Cedarvale Cemetery in Bay City, and his first wife, Helen Maria Webb (February 28, 1832 - September 3, 1970), daughter of Henry L. Webb and granddaughter of Samuel Blanchley Webb of Revolutionary War fame. 
   She was born in Caledonia, Illinois, and died in Oakland, Texas.
   Victor Lawrence “V. L.” LeTulle was educated in the public schools of Colorado County and was engaged in farming there until 1890, when he came to Matagorda County. 
   Here he acquired land and began his farming and ranching activities. 

Thu
14
Jan

Don Braman: Author, first district clerk, mayor of Matagorda, county judge

Matagorda County TXGenWeb

Thu
14
Jan

Bostwick joined early scouting company to control Karankawas

Matagorda County TXGenWeb

Thu
14
Jan

Horse Marines won name near Matagorda Bay

Matagorda County TXGenWeb

Thu
07
Jan

Forrest Bess: Native son a world-class artist

By Anna Sue Thompson
History of Matagorda County
rootsweb.ancestry.com/~txmatago/

Thu
07
Jan

Chinquapin still a remote corner of Matagorda County

   Chinquapin is on an unpaved road on Live Oak Bayou just north of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway and East Matagorda Bay, east of the Big Boggy National Wildlife Refuge, and 18 miles southeast of Bay City in southeastern Matagorda County.    
   It is surrounded by swampland. 
   It and nearby Chinquapin Bayou were probably named for a type of tree in the area. 
   The community, which has been in existence since at least the 1940s, was built on land that was once part of Bay Stock Farm, property owned by John J. LeTulle (a half brother of Victor Lawrence LeTulle). 
   At one time Chinquapin had grown to around 100 cabins. 
   In 1961 it was completely destroyed by Hurricane Carla; it gradually rebuilt, and by 1972 a landing strip and nineteen new dwellings had been added. 
   The community appeared on 1989 highway maps. 
   It is primarily a fishing village. 
   In 2018, the population was 317.

Thu
31
Dec

Hawkinsville headquarters for J.B. Hawkins

   Hawkinsville was a plantation community seventeen miles from what is now Van Vleck in southeastern Matagorda County. 
      It was at a site on Caney Creek, where the rich bottomlands supported a thriving plantation economy before theCivil War. The Hawkinsville Tap of the New York, Texas and Mexican Railway, which ran parallel to what is now Farm road 457, had reached Hawkinsville by 1903. 
   The community was named for plantation owner James Boyd Hawkins, who in 1840 or 1845 brought his wife and a number of slaves to lower Caney Creek. 
   They lived in a two-story colonial-style plantation house, the remains of which stood as late as 2011.  
   Hawkins was among the first in the county to grow sugarcane on a large scale. 
   Around 1852, with slave labor, he built a large sugar mill of kiln-dried brick; the mill was run by steam engine and had a forty-foot-high smokestack. 

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