History

Thu
10
Dec

Obstruction to free flow into Gulf at Matagorda is matter of concern

By Fred S. Robbins 
   [From the archives of Haskell L. Simon with assistance of Jennifer Rodgers, Mary B. McAllister Ingram Archives at the Matagorda County Museum.] 
   Editor’s Note: Fred S. Robbins is one of the county’s oldest citizens. He has spent his life on or near the mouth of the Colorado River and has watched its numerous changes, not only as an interested citizen, but in the capacity of civil engineer.  
   He is at the present time one of the three members of the Matagorda County Conservation and Reclamation Board, which board has charge of all matters pertaining to the river channel, and its present condition, and of that which may be its future. 
   Matagorda County Tribune, Thursday, August 3, 1933

Thu
10
Dec

Legend says Indian brave lost love contest, drowned to form Colorado blockade

   [From the archives of Haskell L. Simon with assistance of Jennifer Rodgers, Mary B. McAllister Ingram Archives at the Matagorda County Museum.] 
Daily Tribune, May 2, 1936  
   Haskell Simon archives

   The mystery of the Colorado River, the dam which blocked the flow of the waters in its channels causing it to spread out over a vast area in its lower reaches, is indeed a freak of nature over which people marveled for more than a century, one over which counties along its upper stream and its lower have contended.   
   It was composed of drifted timbers of all sizes, some as large as four feet in diameter, many of them 50 feet long.   
   These logs together with the brush and silt having been caught by the high waters, rode the bosom of the river’s swift current to the lower channel when it was caught and began to build rapidly until the time it became such a menace to life and property its removal was imperative.  

Thu
03
Dec

Million-dollar drouth leads to discovery of mastodon near Bay City

Houston Post clippings from the discovery of mammoth bones in Matagorda County in 1933.

   EDITOR’S NOTE: Matagorda County historian Carol Gibbs found some interesting newspaper clippings about historical discoveries in Matagorda  County from the collection of the late Haskell Simon. 
   This discovery of a mammoth’s bones in Matagorda County in 1933 was reported on by Houston Post staff writer Ed Kilman.

By Ed Kilman
Houston Post
   Down through the ages the rolling Colorado River has guarded a secret, locked within its watery bosom, of a strange era of strange beings that lived in this land when it was a different planet. 
   And then, its waters parting as though in mystic revelation, the river last week divulged that hidden record of the unfathomed past, written in its quagmire sands thousands or hundreds of thousands of years ago. 
   The Texas stream recently reached its lowest stage within the memory of man, and evidently the lowest since the morning of the world. 

Thu
26
Nov

How Thanksgiving was celebrated in the county over the years

Collegeport
   Citrus Grove and Collegeport observed Thanksgiving with their annual Thanksgiving dinner at Citrus Grove. About 120 were present, including many of the original settlers and out of town guests. Many guests came back that night to attend the “forty-two” and old fashioned play party held there. This Thanksgiving dinner has been given annually ever since Citrus Grove was settled years ago, and serves as a reunion for many old friends.—Daily Tribune, Friday, December 5, 1941
   Midfields
   Mrs. Abbie Anderson and son spent the Thanksgiving holidays in Nada with her daughter, Mrs. Lester Bunge.
   Mr. and Mrs. Ludwin Keller and children spent the Thanksgiving holidays in the home of Mr. and Mrs. R.E. Coffin.
   Miss Gladys Trujcak was home for Thanksgiving holidays.—Daily Tribune, December 3, 1942
   Pledger

Thu
19
Nov

Matagorda doctor went on to become ‘father’ of UTMB

Thomas C. Thompson’s grave at Lakeview Cemetery in Galveston.
From: Find A Grave

   Thomas C. Thompson, physician and pharmacist, was born on September 28, 1839, in Matagorda County, Texas, the son of Johann and Ellen (Emily) Thompson. 
   He attended Baylor University at Independence and the University of North Carolina. 
   He received a medical degree from Jefferson Medical College (Philadelphia) in 1861 and served as a Confederate Army surgeon during the Civil War. 
   Afterwards, Thompson practiced medicine in Matagorda and Columbus for a few years before moving to Galveston. 
   In addition to medical practice, Thompson established a pharmaceutical business in Galveston and San Antonio.  
   He was appointed to the University of Texas Board of Regents in February 1887 and served on that board until his death.  

Thu
12
Nov

"Lumber company founders inspired by Alamo presence"

John Sutherland
Matagorda County TXGenWeb

   EDITOR’S NOTE: Since the Alamo Lumber Company is closing in Bay City, we’re presenting its history that was published in the Bay City Tribune in 1977 and is included in a book of local history.

Thu
05
Nov

Continued: Japanese preacher’s American journey began in Collegeport

   EDITOR’S NOTE: Paul Watanbe came to America in 1903, at the age of 16, from Japan and made his way to Collegeport in 1909, when he was part of the inaugural class at the Gulf Coast University of Industrial Arts at Collegeport.
   This was the start of a remarkable young man’s journey that would also include Bryan College, Baylor and Simmons College in Abilene.
      Next up was Yale.
   We’ll tell about Watanbe’s experience in the next several issues.

From last week
   Two Japanese-American sisters who attended Hardin-Simmons University during World War II have given $7,500 to the institution’s Loyalty Fund from “redress funds” that they received from the United States Government.
   The Loyalty Fund provides scholarship assistance for current and prospective students.

Thu
29
Oct

Continued: Japanese preacher’s American journey began in Collegeport

Courtesy of Wikipedia
Above, Jessie and Grace Watanbe graduated from Hardin-Simmons in 1946.

   EDITOR’S NOTE: Paul Watanbe came to America in 1903, at the age of 16, from Japan and made his way to Collegeport in 1909, when he was part of the inaugural class at the Gulf Coast University of Industrial Arts at Collegeport.
   This was the start of a remarkable young man’s journey that would also include Bryan College, Baylor and Simmons College in Abilene.
      Next up was Yale.
   We’ll tell about Watanbe’s experience in the next several issues.
From last week

      Watanabe Sisters Win High Honors
   Jessie Watanabe, 1946 graduate, was awarded the $25 cash prize during the commencement exercises for the best essay on the subject, “How Can I Improve Race Relations,” given by Elta Campbell Roberts in memory of her sis-
ter, Willie Beatrice Campbell, a graduate of 1913.

Thu
22
Oct

Continued: Japanese preacher’s American journey began in Collegeport

Courtesy of Wikipedi
Church service at Poston 1 Internment Camp.

   EDITOR’S NOTE: Paul Watanbe came to America in 1903, at the age of 16, from Japan and made his way to Collegeport in 1909, when he was part of the inaugural class at the Gulf Coast University of Industrial Arts at Collegeport.
   This was the start of a remarkable young man’s journey that would also include Bryan College, Baylor and Simmons College in Abilene.
      Next up was Yale.
   We’ll tell about Watanbe’s experience in the next several issues.
From last week

      News of evacuation
   When the family received the news of their evacuation, Paul was still at home, though very ill. He packed his library in crates and the Caucasian ministers stored them for him as well as some of the family possessions including Paul’s sermon notes. They sold their appliances and furniture and liquidated their household.

Thu
15
Oct

Continued: Japanese preacher’s American journey began in Collegeport

   EDITOR’S NOTE: Paul Watanbe came to America in 1903, at the age of 16, from Japan and made his way to Collegeport in 1909, when he was part of the inaugural class at the Gulf Coast University of Industrial Arts at Collegeport.
   This was the start of a remarkable young man’s journey that would also include Bryan College, Baylor and Simmons College in Abilene.
      Next up was Yale.
   We’ll tell about Watanbe’s experience in the next several issues.
From last week

      The (Simmons) Brand editor is disappointed that the students of Simmons College did not respond more freely to the proposition to send a cash contribution to Paul Watanabe, an alumnus of the college who is doing evangelistic work in his native country, Japan. 
   The fact that the collection was so small is probably due to the fact that only a small number of students now in school were here when Paul was a student in Simmons. 

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