History

Thu
12
Dec

Area Christmas happenings in early 20th Century

A vintage Christmas card from the early 1900s.

Matagorda County TXGenWeb

 

Thu
05
Dec

Tidehaven students learn Matagorda County history on tour

Photos courtesy of Crystal Taska
A tour of Matagorda County Museum in Bay City was led by Barbara Smith (above), MCM director and Matagorda County Historical Commission member. Smith explains Rivers, Rice and Railroads exhibit.

Matagorda County History Website
www.usgenwebsites.org/TXMatagorda/

     Students in Crystal Taska’s Tidehaven/Wharton County Junior College 1301 & 1302 History classes at Tidehaven High School in Tidehaven ISD participated in a Matagorda County History Field Trip on Nov. 21,which was sponsored by the Matagorda County Historical Commission. 
   Students toured sites in Blessing, Matagorda and Bay City. 
   Taska wanted her students to learn more about history in their own backyards, especially since Matagorda County played such an important role in the early history of Texas. 

Thu
28
Nov

Thanksgiving updates from the ’20s and ’30s

Photo: americangrit.com/en.wikipedia.org
American football and Thanksgiving image from the early 1930s.

Matagorda County History Website
www.usgenwebsites.org/TXMatagorda/

Thu
21
Nov

Palacios Point once hosted town of Portsmouth

Matagorda County Museum
The beach at Portsmouth.

Matagorda County History Website
www.usgenwebsites.org/TXMatagorda/

 

Thu
14
Nov

Martin served as Matagorda doctor, county sheriff

  From the Matagorda County History & Genealogy page, Handbook of Texas Online

 

 James Fisher Martin, doctor, sheriff, and rancher, was born at Newcastle-on-Tyne, England, in 1808. 
   He was educated at Edinburgh, Scotland, and then practiced medicine in Liverpool, England.  
   He immigrated to Anderson County, South Carolina, in 1830, moved to Texas during the Texas Revolution, and attended the wounded after the battle of San Jacinto. 
   Subsequently, he opened a drugstore and doctor’s office in Matagorda. 

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Thu
14
Nov

Williams among Bay Prairie men who died at Goliad

From Handbook of Texas Online   

 

Thu
07
Nov

Burton D. Hurd Land Company’s trip to Collegeport

Matagorda County TXGenWeb
Burton D. Hurd showing his Collegeport land development.

 

Matagorda County History Website
www.usgenwebsites.org/TXMatagorda/

Thu
31
Oct

Peden takes over kindergarten school

www.usgenwebsites.org/TXMatagorda/
The Peden School 1953-54 - kindergarten and first grade.

  By Virginia Peden
Matagorda County History Website
www.usgenwebsites.org/TXMatagorda/

Thu
24
Oct

Kids & Karankawas: A day of learning about tribe most-identified with Matagorda County

Sentinel photo by Mike Reddell
Abby Herreth explained the Karankawa lifestyle to visitors who received a small bag of pecans, one of the foods gathered by the Karankawas.

 

Thu
17
Oct

Karankawas’ resourcefulness helped them to survive

Early image of Karankawas

   The now-extinct Karankawa Indians played an important role in the early history of Texas. 
   The name Karankawa became the accepted designation for several groups or bands of coastal people who shared a common language and culture. 
   Those bands, identified in early historic times, included the Capoques (Coaques, Cocos), Kohanis, Kopanes (Copanes), and Karankawa proper (Carancaquacas). 
   They inhabited the Gulf Coast of Texas from Galveston Bay southwestward to Corpus Christi Bay. 
   All spoke a little-known language called Karankawa, and only about 100 words of that language have been preserved. 
   The significance of the name Karankawa has not been definitely established, although it is generally believed to mean “dog-lovers” or “dog-raisers.” 
   That translation seems plausible, since the Karankawas reportedly kept dogs that were described as a fox-like or coyote-like breed. 

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