History

Wed
15
Feb

"Stone’s exhibit explores African-American music " by: Jessica Shepard

Sentinel photo/Jessica Shepard
Donnye Stone works on arranging the albums in one of her display cases in the lobby of the Matagorda County Museum. Stone’s Black History Month exhibit is “African American Music: ‘Musical Notes’” and will run from now until the end of March.

    “African American Music: ‘Musical Notes,’” is the theme Donnye Stone’s annual Black History Month exhibit in the lobby of the Matagorda County Museum.
   “For the first year I did a Collection of my ‘Black Dolls.’ For the second year I did ‘Authors on Black Books: “Listen, Can’t you Hear?”’ and my third year was “Crowns” a collection of my hats,” said Stone.
   Originally, this year’s exhibit was a toss-up between black movies or music.
   “I chose music because my dear late sister Bonnye D. Massey who simply loved music, most of the time when you visited her home, she always had some type of music playing,” she added.

Wed
15
Feb

"St. Mark Missionary has long served Bell Bottom community" By Johnnie M.Thomas and Mary B.Ingram

From the Matagorda County 
History & Genealogy page

Thu
09
Feb

"Shiloh important for early Black settlers in Cedar Lane" Compiled by Mary Belle Ingram & Shiloh Church Historians Alex Sidney III, Willie Sidney, Dennis Griggs and Chester Kemp

Johnnie Mae Thomas and Jerrilyn Capers
An earlier photo of the Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church congregation.

From the Matagorda County History & Genealogy page

Wed
01
Feb

"Vine Grove: The little church of Live Oak Community" By Thelma Smith From the Matagorda County History & Genealogy page

rootsweb.ancestry.com/~txmatago
Vine Grove Christian Church serves the Live Oak Community today.

   Whether the name Grapevine Church, Home Mission Society, or Vine Grove Christian Church is used, one is still referring to a little church that once was or still exists in Live Oak Community, Matagorda County.   
   The community is on FM 2540 on the Live Oak Bayou in an area where the bayou crosses FM 521.    
   From the city limits of Bay City, travel east six miles on FM 457 to the intersection of 457 and FM 2540.    
   Turn right onto FM 2540 and go southeast some six more miles, and the Live Oak Community comes into view.   
   Prior to the Civil War, the community was a large plantation owned by John L. Thorp.    
   Thorp farmed cotton and sugar cane and had approximately one hundred slaves to do the work.    
   Before coming to Matagorda County, Thorp was a farmer in Greenville County, Va.    
   The Emancipation Proclamation was signed Jan. 1, 1863, and the news reached Texas on June 19, 1865.    

Wed
18
Jan

Founding Bay City was Swickheimer’s biggest success

rootsweb.ancestry.com/~txmatago
The Matagorda County Courthouse is in the background of this picture. Some people lived in tents in the early days of Bay City until they could build or buys a house. This appaears to be an early business. Notice the U.S. flag. The bridge is probably over Cottonwood Creek, east of the square.

From Handbook of Texas Online

Wed
18
Jan

Braman: Matagorda mayor, county judge, popular author

rootsweb.ancestry.com/~txmatago
Braman Home in Matagorda on Bluff Street (SE corner of Laurel & Matagorda Ave.)

  From Handbook of Texas Online

Thu
12
Jan

Allenhurst 1st new townsite east of Bay City

There was an African-American church in Allenhurst, above, the building is no longer standing. Below, this shows the inside of the church, Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church that was started in 1908.
rootsweb.ancestry.com/~txmatago

 

From the Matagorda County History & Genealogy page

Thu
12
Jan

Early Texan Eudora Moore a longtime Matagorda County teacher

Eudora Moore

 Eudora Inez Moore, teacher and writer, the only daughter of Robert Baxter and Mary Crowell (Layton) Moore, was born in Victoria County, Texas, on November 17, 1847. 
   The family, which eventually also included six sons, had sailed to Texas from Mobile, Alabama, the previous summer. 
   They settled three miles below Victoria, where they had bought 100 acres on the Guadalupe River. 
   About 1849 the Moores bought land near Indianola, which was then a small village, and built a house on the shore of a lake known for a time as Moore’s Lake. 
   Eudora was educated through private instruction there. 
   She is remembered for her reminiscences, “Recollections of Indianola,” first published in the Wharton Spectator in 1934 and reprinted in the Indianola Scrapbook in 1936. 

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Thu
05
Jan

"Peninsula’s army airfield still functions as airport today" by Air Force Historical Research Agency

The U.S. Army Air Corps built the Matagorda Peninsula airfield with three runways in 1942 and later added two more runways. This U.S. Army photo in 1943 shows the field with 100 aircraft. 

   The Matagorda Peninsula Army airfield was built during 1942 by the Army Air Corps, primarily to support the Matagorda Bombing Range on Matagorda Island to the south. 
   In addition, it was also developed as a training school by Army Air Forces Training Command. 
   Matagorda AAF was the home of the AAF Pilot School (Advanced Single Engine), and also conducted a Single-Engine pilot transmission school. 
   The major military units assigned were the 62d Single Engine Flying Training Group and 79th Bombardier Training Group. 
   Initially built with three runways, during the war two additional runways were added to accommodate the large number of landings and takeoffs. 
   Aircraft assigned to the base were North American AT-6 Texans, Curtiss P-40 Warhawks, Republic P-47 Thunderbolts, and North American P-51 Mustangs. 
   A series of curved roads on the east side of the parking ramp had dozens of buildings. 

Thu
29
Dec

"Various legends surround naming of El Maton" From the Matagorda County History & Genealogy page Historic Matagorda County, Volume I

rootsweb.ancestry.com/~txmatago
Mrs. Clarence Doman purchased the Hotel Collegeport and used the lumber to build this home at El Maton.

   El Maton, dating back to 1905, is situated twelve miles west of Bay City on FM 1095. El Maton is a Spanish name meaning “the killer,” which was bestowed on the community by the Missouri-Pacific Railroad Company. 
   The town haw several legendary versions telling why it is so named.
   According to one version, it is said that a group of Mexicans, who had been drinking, got into an argument and began fighting on the spot where the railroad track now crosses FM 1095. 
   Several of the group were killed in the action, and thus the place became known by the Spanish words “El Maton.”
   Another legend involves a railroad accident. 
   In this version a Mexican man was accidentally killed in 1905, when his foot got caught on a rail, and a handcart ran over him.
   Some say El Maton got its name from the slaughterhouse which was once situated in this area. 
   In the early days cattle were hilled here only for their hides and tallow. 

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